Jump label

Service navigation

Main navigation

You are here:

Main content

Everyday life in the context of changing gender relations: activities, trips, travel modes and time use (2009 - 2015)

Project goals:

The project examines the question as to whether changes in gender relations are reflected in the daily routines of women and men. The context is set up by the discourse on changing gender relations in the social sciences and the gender debate in planning. The project aims to contribute to these debates by focussing on gender-specific responsibilities for out-of-home activities, the trips required for these activities, and the time budgets necessary. Four questions are at the centre:

1. Which gender-specific differences in activity patterns, time budgets and travel behaviour can be found empirically over and above mere differences between men and women, when gender is understood as a complex social category?

2. Which trends over time (including trends, cohort effects, structural breaks) can be found for the period 1976 to 2008, in which gender relations have changed substantially?

3. Which types of gender-specific division of work do exist in terms of activity patterns, time budgets and travel demand (e.g., 'traditional', 'egalitarian', 'reversed role pattern')? How frequent are the types?

4. Which effects do biographical key events (such as the birth of a child, entry into the labour market, or retiring) have on the gender-specific allocation of tasks in partnerships?

 

Methodology:

The project is based on descriptive and multivariate statistical procedures. The data used are national household surveys of travel behaviour, including KONTIV/Mobility in Germany 1976, 1982, 1989, 2002 and 2008, and the German Mobility Panel 1994 to 2008. The former is a repeated cross-sectional random day survey. The latter records travel behaviour over a whole week in three consecutive years for each responding household.

 

Funding:

German Research Foundation (DFG)

 



Sub content

Contact

Prof. Dr. Joachim Scheiner
Associate Professor
Tel.: 0231 755-4822